Connectors 101

Connectors 101

# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
There are currently 20 names in this directory
LANYARD
A device attached to certain connectors that permits uncoupling and separation of connector halves by a pull on a wire or cable.

LANYARD RELEASE
A plug that is designed to be separated from a receptacle by an axial pull of an attached lanyard without damage to the plug or receptacle. Most often used where quick release is required.

LAP JOINT
The juncture of two conductors placed side by side so that they overlap. (see PARALLEL SPLICE and SPLICE)

LASER SOLDERING
A selective soldering technique employing a A selective soldering technique employing a programmable laser system. The laser soldering system is effective for high volume selective soldering of wire wrapping pins to backplanes, powerplanes and PC boards.

LAST BREAK
The last conductor to lose physical contact when two connector halves or a socket and an electrical component that have been previously mated, are physically separated from one another.

LEVEL OF INTERCONNECTION
The connection point between components (tubes, transistors, IC packages) and the PC board or chassis.

LIFE CYCLE
A test that indicated the time span before failure; the test occurs in a controlled, usually accelerated environment.

LIVE-LINE CONNECTOR
A connector that may be installed or removed by means of an insulated stick while the conductor is energized.

LOADBREAK CONNECTOR
A connector designed to close and interrupt current on energized circuits.

LOCATOR
That part of the crimping die, positioner or turret head that places the terminal, splice or contact in the correct crimping area of the crimping tool or die.

LOCKING DEVICE
A feature incorporated in certain components to provide mechanical retention of their mating parts.

LOCKING SPRING
A spring device either on the contact or installed in the connector insert whose purpose is to retain the contact in the insert.

LONGITUDINAL INDENT
An indent shape where the longest dimension is in line with the connector barrel.

LOOP INDUCTANCE (LLoop)
The inductance of two or more conductors in which the current flows into one conductor and returns through the other(s). The loop is defined as the current path inscribed by the ‘drive’ and ‘return’ path in the conductors. INSERT FORMULA where: L1 = self inductance of the driven conductor L2 = self inductance of the return path conductor(s) Lm = mutual inductance between the drive and return path conductors.

LOSS
Energy dissipated without performing useful work. A decrease in power suffered by a signal as it is transmitted from one point to another. (transmission loss)

LOW INSERTION FORCE (LIF)
A connector whose inherent design calls for the plug to need an insertion (mating) force that is "less" force than "normal" for usual designs of that type of connector. For example, if a connector design normally requires 16 lbs. of mating force, then a 4 lb. force would be considered low (LIF), an arbitrary term for most applications.

LOW INSERTION FORCE SOCKET (LIF)
A socket in which the contact surfaces normally touch as they are mated and demate. Values are generally established as a force below one Newton (.225 pound) per contact, but greater than zero Newtons (0 pounds).

LOW LEVEL CIRCUIT RESISTANCE (LLCR)
This term indicates the contact resistance characteristics of a contact system under conditions where applied voltages (≤ 20 mv) and currents (low millamp range) do not alter the physical contact interface. Sometimes referred to as “Dry Circuit” conditions.

LOW ORDER MODE
A propagation path that makes a relatively small angle with respect to the fiber axis.

LUG
(See TERMINAL)